No Bull, No Bucks.

Dedicated to animal-free recipes using cheap, real ingredients. No bullshit, no big bucks.

Canadian Non-Vegan Beers: Drink Something Else, Eh?

soycrates:

Here is a list of currently known non-vegan beers produced in Canada (it was easier to list the non-vegan ones as the vegan ones outnumber them) for all of my tipsy, boozy Canadian friends who hate the god-awful beers typically found on our domestic list.

Canadian beers with honey, milk, etc. in…

BBQ Tofu Instructional

How to make the most delicious looking BBQ tofu you have EVER seen. Amazing but horribly time consuming.

soycrates:

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I’d be more than willing to post up a preview of the first 25 pages of my new book "No Bull, No Bucks" if I knew that people were interested in seeing it before the final cut: if you’re interested, please donate and share this post.

Some of the feature recipes in the first 25 pages are the Scrambled Brains Tofu, Carrot Cake Waffles, Not-Quite-Amy’s Teriyaki Bowl and Spinach Mushroom Pockets (as well as including the chapters on the philosophy of consciousness and the many different approaches to modern ethics).

Easy Vegan Halloween/Fall Recipes:
Classic Caramel Apples
Eerie Banana Mummies
Witch’s Brewthie
Apple Bites You!
Terrifying Pumpkin Cupcakes (use store bought frosting if needed)
Scary-as-shit Braincakes
Spooky Pizza Ideas (use a basic pizza sauce and a thicker version of this easy cheeze sauce to make it cheaper and quicker!)
Menacing Medjool Rolo Knock-Offs
Frightening Pumpkin Smoothie for 2 (sans chia seeds and blackstrap molasses - share it with a ghost!)
Batty Pancake Idea
Mashed Bootato Ghosts
Stuffed Jack-O-Peppers
Tentacle Pot Pie
Try a vegan creamed broccoli or butternut squash soup, grab a piping hot cider, and get inventive with all of the wonderfully ghoulish green things you can make with green veggies. Stick spooky eyes on everything.

Easy Vegan Halloween/Fall Recipes:

Try a vegan creamed broccoli or butternut squash soup, grab a piping hot cider, and get inventive with all of the wonderfully ghoulish green things you can make with green veggies. Stick spooky eyes on everything.

soycrates:

What is a vegan?
Veganism is a philosophy and a way of living. A vegan is someone who seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose.
This is different from someone who adopts a plant-based diet for health and fitness reasons, just like it would be different from someone who was allergic to animal products in food but used animal products and other methods of exploitation in their daily life, or someone who boycotted venues of animal captivity (zoos, circuses, etc.) but ate meat, dairy, and eggs. 
Why do people go vegan?
Preventing cruelty to animals is the major reason people choose to go vegan, although veganism is often motivated by other ethical factors, such as environmental concerns and humanitarian reasons.
About 60 billion land animals and over a trillion marine animals are used and killed as commodities to satisfy human taste preferences, with millions more being killed or exploited for fashion, entertainment, and research. We breed animals into existence at such an alarming rate that it not only affects their health, but the health of our environment and the sustainability of our society and lifestyle. The agricultural industries which facilitate animal cruelty maintain the worst documented treatment to human workers compared to other methods of agriculture. 
In a world that is beginning to show real support for environmental, humanitarian, and animal rights issues, veganism is the logical next step.
Isn’t it enough to be vegetarian, or do meat-free mondays?
The suffering caused by the dairy and egg industry is possibly less well publicised than the plight of factory farmed animals. The production of dairy products necessitates the death of countless male calves that are of no use to the dairy farmer, as well as the premature death of cows slaughtered when their milk production decreases. Similarly, in the egg industry, even ‘ethical’ or ‘free range’ eggs involve the killing of the unnecessary male chicks when just a day old, often being thrown alive into a shredder. These industries also contribute to the environmental impact of animal products, and take up valuable land.
When we realize that we care about these issues, it makes more sense that we should change our behaviour in ways that reflect our values rather than to make symbolic or temporary changes. We want our actions to have noticeable effects on the world around us, and though we can say “every little action helps”, we know it’s better to take more actions than fewer, and bigger actions than smaller.
With animal exploitation leading the climate crisis, contributing to poor resource management, human rights violations and severe animal abuse, it’s easy to get motivated enough to make the leap into veganism.
From a dietary perspective, is veganism healthy?
The American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada said in 2003 that properly planned plant-based diets were nutritionally adequate for all stages of life, including pregnancy and lactation; people avoiding meat and dairy products are reported to have lower death rates from ischemic heart disease, lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and fewer incidences of type 2 diabetes and prostate and colon cancers.
Protein (including all essential amino acids), iron, calcium, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamin b12 can all be found in plant-based food products. Many staples of the average vegan food pantry are nutritionally fortified. Check out this website for more info.
Being vegan and eating a plant-based diet doesn’t guarantee good health, since there is plenty of vegan junk food on the market. Just like in a non-vegan dietary lifestyle, it is up to you whether or not personal health is your top priority.
Is veganism hard or expensive?
Some people claim veganism is unattainable because it is only for the middle-class or only for those with plenty of time on their hands. And while it takes a little time to research how and why one should go vegan, it can be a very inexpensive and rewarding lifestyle. If you’ve ever been told you can’t go vegan because of these reasons, there are plenty of resources out there to help you along the way and show you that veganism is accessible to a wide variety of people.
Where should I go to learn more about veganism?
Visit my FAQ on veganism or check out The Vegan Society (many of the statistics, definitions and explanations in this post are sourced from their website).

soycrates:

What is a vegan?

Veganism is a philosophy and a way of living. A vegan is someone who seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose.

This is different from someone who adopts a plant-based diet for health and fitness reasons, just like it would be different from someone who was allergic to animal products in food but used animal products and other methods of exploitation in their daily life, or someone who boycotted venues of animal captivity (zoos, circuses, etc.) but ate meat, dairy, and eggs. 

Why do people go vegan?

Preventing cruelty to animals is the major reason people choose to go vegan, although veganism is often motivated by other ethical factors, such as environmental concerns and humanitarian reasons.

About 60 billion land animals and over a trillion marine animals are used and killed as commodities to satisfy human taste preferences, with millions more being killed or exploited for fashion, entertainment, and research. We breed animals into existence at such an alarming rate that it not only affects their health, but the health of our environment and the sustainability of our society and lifestyle. The agricultural industries which facilitate animal cruelty maintain the worst documented treatment to human workers compared to other methods of agriculture. 

In a world that is beginning to show real support for environmental, humanitarian, and animal rights issues, veganism is the logical next step.

Isn’t it enough to be vegetarian, or do meat-free mondays?

The suffering caused by the dairy and egg industry is possibly less well publicised than the plight of factory farmed animals. The production of dairy products necessitates the death of countless male calves that are of no use to the dairy farmer, as well as the premature death of cows slaughtered when their milk production decreases. Similarly, in the egg industry, even ‘ethical’ or ‘free range’ eggs involve the killing of the unnecessary male chicks when just a day old, often being thrown alive into a shredder. These industries also contribute to the environmental impact of animal products, and take up valuable land.

When we realize that we care about these issues, it makes more sense that we should change our behaviour in ways that reflect our values rather than to make symbolic or temporary changes. We want our actions to have noticeable effects on the world around us, and though we can say “every little action helps”, we know it’s better to take more actions than fewer, and bigger actions than smaller.

With animal exploitation leading the climate crisis, contributing to poor resource management, human rights violations and severe animal abuse, it’s easy to get motivated enough to make the leap into veganism.

From a dietary perspective, is veganism healthy?

The American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada said in 2003 that properly planned plant-based diets were nutritionally adequate for all stages of life, including pregnancy and lactation; people avoiding meat and dairy products are reported to have lower death rates from ischemic heart disease, lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and fewer incidences of type 2 diabetes and prostate and colon cancers.

Protein (including all essential amino acids), iron, calcium, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamin b12 can all be found in plant-based food products. Many staples of the average vegan food pantry are nutritionally fortified. Check out this website for more info.

Being vegan and eating a plant-based diet doesn’t guarantee good health, since there is plenty of vegan junk food on the market. Just like in a non-vegan dietary lifestyle, it is up to you whether or not personal health is your top priority.

Is veganism hard or expensive?

Some people claim veganism is unattainable because it is only for the middle-class or only for those with plenty of time on their hands. And while it takes a little time to research how and why one should go vegan, it can be a very inexpensive and rewarding lifestyle. If you’ve ever been told you can’t go vegan because of these reasons, there are plenty of resources out there to help you along the way and show you that veganism is accessible to a wide variety of people.

Where should I go to learn more about veganism?

Visit my FAQ on veganism or check out The Vegan Society (many of the statistics, definitions and explanations in this post are sourced from their website).

Anonymous asked: my family tell me that soy is really dangerous for my health? especially because i have breast cancer in my family? i feel like thats a lie but i have a severe hormonal imbalance and i'm getting paranoid about my soy consumption (2-3 litres a week) even though I had a hormonal imbalance before i ever tasted soy.

Don’t fall prey to the soy mongering!

Also, the time you’re calling “before I ever tasted soy” is probably not a time in which you never ate soy. Soy products are a common additive - Mono and diglycerides (often containing soy) and soy lecithin, for example. Some products are processed without listing a soy ingredient directly on the package, such as meats that have been used to make broth.

And for sure you’ve had phytoestrogens in your diet before you ever ate anything like tofu or drank soy milk (list in the link above). Your family probably believes “soy is bad for your health” while unknowingly consuming soy and other sources of phytoestrogens themselves.

Anonymous asked: do you have any favourite cheap dishes that you like to make when you don't have the energy to spend 20+ minutes cooking? i want to go vegan but i have a disability and cooking is a huge exhausting, stressful experience for me.

I have depression, so a lot of the time I feel the same way (though I don’t know your situation, so I can’t make any real comparisons).

It takes me 15 minutes or less to boil macaroni pasta and make a quick cheese sauce (like this one) by sticking it in the microwave instead of putting it on the stove. (Plus, mac and cheese definitely cheers me up).

Other times are: beans and rice, salad (pre-made) and a sandwich, or sauteeing a vegetable or two and serving them with a sauce next to some sweet potato fries (from frozen - I used to have the spare time and motivation to cut up sweet potatoes from scratch, and it was fun, but WAY harder than it needed to be). Most of the time when I don’t feel like staying in the kitchen for long, I ask myself which foods require the least amount of my effort, even if they take 20+ minutes in the oven to cook. Some quicker recipes can actually be more effort-consuming (those that involve lots of chopping or blending). Extra firm tofu can be less time consuming, because it’s manageable to skip pressing it and still end up with something good (I usually go for baked BBQ tofu).

When I hit all time lows, I make sure I have a nutrient-dense, calorie-dense green smoothie drink in my fridge (or cheaper cans of instant smoothie in the freezer) to make sure I don’t miss out on all the benefits of a meal if I just end up snacking.

Anonymous asked: idk if this is a problem or not, but i hate tofu, and i hate beans ... like .. would that be a big problem for me if i went vegan?

Veganism makes most people a lot less picky with their food, so you’d probably end up liking beans and tofu, but even if you didn’t, nobody’s forcing you to eat them. They’re not required to live a happy vegan life.

But if you’re not vegan yet, how can you say you hate tofu? Most non-vegans can’t make tofu properly. Heck, I know plenty of vegans who don’t even know how to make good tofu, either. I don’t want to say this discouragingly - it makes sense that the majority of people don’t know how to cook with tofu, as it’s not a common household food item for many, especially Americans on an bland/average diet.

vegan-yums:

Quick & Dirty 5-Ingredient Vegan Cheeze Sauce / Recipe 
*I just made this, without the Dijon mustard and added lemon pepper…was so good tho *^* and easy

This is fairly similar to the cheese sauce I regularly use for all of my recipes, except I often use more nooch (because I like the flavour) and I use oil instead of margarine (cheaper).

Nothing “dirty” about a vegan recipe we can actually afford!

(via from-meat-to-bean)